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How to say bird in japanese?

Category: How

Author: Sally Chapman

Published: 2020-08-28

Views: 211

How to say bird in japanese?

The word for bird in Japanese is "tori". There are many different ways to say this word, depending on the context in which it is used. For example, the word "tori" can be used to describe a specific type of bird, such as a crow or a sparrow. It can also be used more generally to refer to all birds.

When using the word "tori" to describe a specific type of bird, it is important to be aware of the different kanji that can be used to write this word. The most common kanji for "tori" is 鳥, which is read as "to". This kanji is used when referring to birds in general. However, there are other kanji that can be used to write "tori" depending on the specific type of bird being referred to. For example, the kanji 鴇 (とき) is used to refer to a specific kind of crane, while the kanji 鷹 (たか) is used to refer to a specific kind of hawk.

When using the word "tori" more generally to refer to all birds, it is usually read as "tori" and written with the kanji 鳥. However, in some cases it may be read as "tori-zari" and written with the kanji 鳥雀. This is typically done when making a distinction between birds and other animals, such as when saying "tori-zari no kai" (the bird and animal kingdom).

In addition to the word "tori", there are a few other words that can be used to refer to birds in Japanese. The word "kamome" (かもめ) is used to refer to seagulls, while the word "hiyodori" (ひよどり) is used to refer to wild birds in general. The word "washi" (わし) is also used to refer to eagles.

When referring to a specific type of bird, it is important to be aware of the different words that can be used to describe that bird. For example, the word "tori" can be used to refer to a specific type of bird, such as a crow or a sparrow. It can also be used more generally to refer to all birds. In addition to the word

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How do you say "bird" in Japanese?

There are a few different ways to say bird in Japanese. One way is to use the word "tori". This word can be used for both wild and domestic birds. Another way to say bird in Japanese is to use the word "hato". This word is typically used for wild birds. There are also a few other words that can be used to describe different types of birds, such as "ushi" for cattle egret, "kotori" for small birds, "washi" for eagle, and "tanchou" for crane.

The word "tori" is the most common word used for bird in Japanese. It can be used for both wild and domestic birds. The word "hato" is also a common word used for bird in Japanese, but it is typically used for wild birds. There are also a few other words that can be used to describe different types of birds, such as "ushi" for cattle egret, "kotori" for small birds, "washi" for eagle, and "tanchou" for crane.

The word "tori" is derived from the Chinese word "鳥" which means bird. The word "hato" is derived from the Chinese word "鵬" which also means bird. The word "ushi" is derived from the Chinese word "牛" which means cattle. The word "kotori" is derived from the Japanese word "小鳥" which means small bird. The word "washi" is derived from the Japanese word "鷲" which means eagle. The word "tanchou" is derived from the Japanese word "燕" which means crane.

The word "tori" is the most common word used for bird in Japanese. It can be used for both wild and domestic birds. The word "hato" is also a common word used for bird in Japanese, but it is typically used for wild birds. There are also a few other words that can be used to describe different types of birds, such as "ushi" for cattle egret, "kotori" for small birds, "washi" for eagle, and "tanchou" for crane.

The word "tori" is derived from the Chinese word "鳥" which means bird. The word "hato" is derived from the Chinese

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How do you say "bird" in different dialects of Japanese?

In Japanese, the word for "bird" can be pronounced in several different ways, depending on the dialect of Japanese that is being spoken. In the standard dialect of Japanese, the word for "bird" is pronounced as "tori." However, in the Kansai dialect of Japanese, the word for "bird" is pronounced as "zura." In the Hokkaido dialect of Japanese, the word for "bird" is pronounced as "tata." And in the Ryukyu dialect of Japanese, the word for "bird" is pronounced as "kari." Each of these different pronunciations reflects the different linguistic influences that have shaped the different Japanese dialects over time.

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What are some common phrases involving the word "bird" in Japanese?

In Japan, there are many common phrases involving the word "bird." For example, the phrase "tori no koe ga kikoeru" literally means "I can hear the bird's voice." This is often used to describe the feeling of being able to hear the birds singing in the morning.

Another common phrase is "tori no koe ga kikoemasu ka?" This literally means "Can you hear the bird's voice?" but is often used to ask if someone can hear something that is far away.

Finally, the phrase "tori ni natte" means "to become a bird." This is often used to describe the feeling of freedom that comes with flying.

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What are some alternative ways to say "bird" in Japanese?

There are many different ways to say bird in Japanese depending on the context in which it is used. Here are some common examples:

鳥 (とり) - this is the most general word for bird and can be used in any context.

鳩 (はと) - this word specifically refers to pigeons and doves.

鶏 (にわとり) - this word refers to chicken.

烏 (からす) - this word refers to crows and ravens.

雀 (すずめ) - this word refers to sparrows.

鴎 (おか) - this word refers to seagulls.

In addition to these specific words for different types of birds, there are also many different ways to say bird in Japanese depending on the context in which it is used. For example, the word for bird can be used as a metaphor for someone who is lighthearted or as a symbol of freedom.

鳥は、自由を象徴する動物です。

鳥は、心が軽い人を比喩することもできます。

Thus, there are many different ways to say bird in Japanese depending on the context in which it is used.

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What are some common Kanji used to write "bird" in Japanese?

In Japanese, there are a few different ways to write the word “bird”. The most common way is to use the Kanji 鳥, which can be read as “tori”. This Kanji is used in many different compound words, such as 鳥居 (tori-i), which means “birdhouse”, and 鳥取 (tori-tori), which means “bird catching”.

Another common way to write “bird” in Kanji is 隠, which is read as “in”. This Kanji is often used in compounds such as 隠れ鳥 (in-tori), which means “hidden bird”, and 隠居 (in-i), which means “living in hiding”.

There are also a few other less common Kanji that can be used to write “bird”. One is 小鳥 (ko-tori), which means “little bird”. Another is 雀 (suzume), which is read as “sparrow”. This Kanji is often used in compounds such as 雀草 (suzume-gusoku), which means “sparrow grass”, and 雀巣 (suzume-so), which means “sparrow nest”.

Finally, there is the Kanji 頭 (zu), which means “head”. This Kanji is sometimes used in the compound word 頭鳥 (zu-tori), which means “chief bird”.

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What are some common compounds involving the word "bird" in Japanese?

There are many common compounds involving the word "bird" in Japanese. Here are some of the most common:

鳥類 (とりるい, torirui): bird

鳥肉 (とりにく, toriniku): bird meat

鳥無き (とりなき, torinaki): without birds

鳥居 (とりい, torii): bird house

鳥獣医 (とりじゅうい, torijuuichi): veterinary

鳥草屋 (とりそうや, torisouya): pet store

鳥図鑑 (とりずかん, torizukan): bird guide

鳥取県 (とりとりけん, toritoriken): Tottori Prefecture

鳥取砂丘 (とりとりさきゅう, toritorisakyuu): Tottori Sand Dunes

These are just some of the many common compounds involving the word "bird" in Japanese. As you can see, the word "bird" can be used in a variety of different ways and contexts. Whether you're talking about the bird itself, the meat of a bird, or even a place where birds live, the word "bird" is sure to come in handy. So next time you're in Japan, don't be afraid to use it!

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What are some common uses of the word "bird" in Japanese?

In Japan, the word "bird" is used in a variety of ways. One common use is to refer to a person who is regarded as being particularly beautiful. For example, a woman might be described as "a beautiful bird" if she is considered to be very attractive.

Another common use of the word "bird" in Japanese is to refer to someone who is regarded as being particularly stupid or foolish. For example, a man might be described as "a stupid bird" if he does something that is considered to be very foolish.

The word "bird" can also be used to refer to a variety of different things, such as a type of food, a type of animal, or a type of plant.

In general, the word "bird" is used in a variety of different ways in Japanese. It can be used to refer to a person who is considered to be either very beautiful or very foolish. It can also be used to refer to a variety of different things, such as a type of food, a type of animal, or a type of plant.

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What are some common idioms involving the word "bird" in Japanese?

There are many idioms involving birds in Japanese. Some of the most common ones are:

鳥の言葉は空に飛ぶ (chō no kotoba wa sora ni tobu) – “A bird’s words fly away into the sky.” This means that what someone says can be easily forgotten.

百鳥聖域 (hyakuchō seikyū) – “A hundred birds’ sacred territory.” This refers to a place where many different kinds of birds gather.

鳥籠に鳥はいらない (tori no kago ni tori wa iranai) – “Birds don’t need a birdcage.” This means that people don’t need to be restricted or controlled.

鳥は自分の羽で飛ぶ (tori wa jibun no hane de tobu) – “Birds fly with their own wings.” This means that people should rely on their own abilities and not depend on others.

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What are some common proverbs involving the word "bird" in Japanese?

There are many proverbs involving birds in Japanese. Here are some common ones:

鳥は知らず羽を失くす - "A bird will lose its feathers if it doesn't know [the importance of] them." This is a proverb that means one will lose what is important to them if they don't know how to take care of it.

鳩を野に落とす - "To release a pigeon in the wild." This is a proverb that means to let something go that you no longer have use for.

鳥の肌は白い - "A bird's skin is white." This is a proverb that means that people are not all the same on the inside, no matter what their outside appearance may be.

鳥のように羽を広げて飛べ - "Spread your wings like a bird and fly." This is a proverb that means to do something to the best of your ability.

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Related Questions

What is the dominant language in Japan today?

Japanese is the dominant language used inJapan today.

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There is no one definitive answer to this question and it will depend on the definition of "dialect" that is used. Some linguists believe that Okinawan is a separate language from Japanese, while others view it as a regional variation of the Japanese language. Regardless of whether or not it is classified as a dialect of Japanese, all languages exhibit some degree of variation, and so Okinawan should not be regarded as anything exceptional.

What is an adjective in Japanese?

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What are some Japanese proverbs that are similar to English?

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What are idioms in Japanese?

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How to say thank you for your hard work in Japanese?

Thank you for your hard work!

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What is the meaning of the Japanese proverb'Ignorance Is Bliss'?

The proverb means that it is easier to be happy and carefree if you don't know the truth.

What are some Japanese idioms that are derived from Chinese?

Some Japanese idioms that are derived from Chinese include: ianarawashi ( 言い習わし), yojijukugo ( 四字熟語), and iigo ( いご飯).

What are some Japanese idioms that are hard to remember?

There are a lot of Japanese idioms that are hard to remember, but some of the more famous ones include yojijukugo (四字熟語) and kanyouku (慣用句). These two idioms consist of four kanji characters each. Because they are made up of multiple characters, it can be difficult for beginners to remember them. However, once you learn how to read and/or know some common Japanese idioms, these will come in handy!

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What does the Japanese idiom out of the mouth mean?

This Japanese idiom means that whatever is said out of turn or without thinking will backfire and cause trouble. Another idiom that has a similar meaning is 言わぬが花 (iwanu ga hana), which means that it's better to keep silent than to accidentally say something wrong.

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